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3 Million Teens Leave Facebook In 3 Years: The 2014 Facebook Demographic Report

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3 years ago, we published a report on 2011 Facebook Demographics & Statistics that covered gender, location, education, and more (US only). Recently we dove into Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to get a refreshed snapshot of the same data points to see what exactly has happened over time and to look at the numbers behind many recent claims: teenagers are leaving by the millions. Enjoy!

FB 2014

Top Insights:

1) Teens (13-17) on Facebook have declined -25.3% over the last 3 years.

2) Over the same period of time, 55+ has exploded with +80.4% growth in the last 3 years.

3) Of the major metropolitan areas, San Francisco saw the highest growth with +148.6%, a stark contrast with Houston which saw +23.8% growth.

We also took a closer look at the Teens (13-17 year olds) and the Folks (55+) to get a better understanding of their current representation on Facebook. Here you go:

FB 2014.1

UPDATE — Thanks for all the feedback and comments on this post, here’s a quick clarification:

Many have commented on the fact that “Teens” (age 13-17 in this post) as we recorded in 2011 have now grown into the 18-24 year old demographic. While that’s true, the primary point of this post was simply to draw attention to the fact that Facebook’s Social Advertising platform shows 3 million fewer addressable 13-17 year olds today compared to 2011.

186 Responses to “3 Million Teens Leave Facebook In 3 Years: The 2014 Facebook Demographic Report”

  1. Geoffery Miller says:

    Unkown on the chart: Unknown.

  2. Jim Schartz says:

    Is it because teens are leaving or because those younger teens are now young adults and therefore do not fit in that category? Perhaps the younger ones growing into the teen ages aren’t infatuated with Facebook as much as the older generation was (those 24-28 right now) who were only able to join Facebook with a college e-mail.

    • Dunklebee says:

      That is the Same theory I had on this. I also think the reason newer teens are not joining FB is because their parents are already on there and now do not allow them to join because they know what FB is. When it was new many parents did not know the site their kids were joining, now most parents use Facebook and know there is the potential for harassment of their children so they do not let them sign up.

      • Shaun says:

        You’re right and you’re wrong. Teens are abandoning facebook BECAUSE their parents are on it, not because their parents won’t allow them to join. Not many teens are interested in the idea of their parents being a part of their social life, let alone a part of their online social life. Also, facebook is far more complex than the simpler forms of social media which are available, ie Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat, etc. and offer the same interaction with your friends with less of the hassle. Also, parents don’t generally use those formats and stick to facebook.

        • chrisc says:

          If only facebook had some connection to instagram…

        • Shart says:

          This is a bigger part of it than anything else, I think. I personally ended up straying away from Facebook simply because my parents and much older siblings decided to pick it up – I found myself getting questioned and prodded by my parents about “concerns” they found on my Facebook page, accusations about the people I hang out with because they saw *their* page, etc.

          And that was when I was 19. Wasn’t even a minor. Still frustrated me enough that I didn’t feel it was worth the effort.

      • Dave says:

        My take is that the young adults who flocked to Facebook in the early days are the ones who now have children in that age range and now that it is gaining traction with the grandparents teens don’t want to be hanging out on Facebook. It’s like kids hating the music their parents like.

      • Kevin says:

        Your theory is partially correct, however, a parent cannot prevent their rebellious teenager from secretly signing up for an account (FB requires users to be 13+). Both Facebook and MySpace are both fads, their popularity is temporary and will be replaced with new trends. Teens aren’t necessarily disinterested in Facebook, they may utilize other mediums of social networks (e.g. Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Tumblr). Further, rebellious thirteen year olds may delete their accounts to avoid adding their parents as friends — anything their parents like becomes uncool — “Facebook is for old people.”
        Young adults (such as myself) who formally used Facebook are currently entering the job market and “age-out” and/or close their accounts (for professional reasons) and graduate to Linked-In.

    • Reno says:

      Jim, that’s *exactly* the point.

    • Ryan says:

      Certainly there is some reason that the “Teen” group is no longer as excited about Facebook as they were in 2011, and seeing their parents on the site is a popular theory.

      As for the people considered “Teen” in 2011 no longer fitting in that category, this is reasonable, and they should be now considered in the 18-24 demographic (which is also concerning to Facebook since that category saw a decline, too). However, we should assume that there should be new users that were too young even for the “Teen” grouping (somewhere between the age of 10 and 13 in 2011, and now at least 13 years old in 2014). Now THAT is bad news for Facebook.

      Further, and missed in the article, was the huge drop in “College” users (a decrease of almost 60%). Since Facebook started as a college-only site, Zuckerberg has to be wincing if these figures are accurate.

    • Hellopuka says:

      No. If what your saying is true then why would elderly people be joining in their 70′s. It is because their parents and teachers are joining. When at college, it’s a way to keep tabs on them. When in high school or college, you don’t want your parents and teachers in your social media. Think about it.

  3. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  4. Tony says:

    Ask any teenager and they’ll tell you, “No one uses Facebook anymore, everyone is on twitter”

  5. Twon says:

    San Francisco doesn’t even have anywhere near 1.8 million people in the city. There should be a study on how many users create a profile for their pets or multiple profiles for themselves.

  6. Mark Svoboda says:

    I couldn’t help but notice the 5,852.4% increase of interest in “Rock&Roll (Music)”

    …right on, Mr. White!

  7. Bob says:

    In the age group of 13-17, half of them would have been moved into the next age group from 2011 – 2014. In 18-24, a third would go into the next group. So instead of it being teens leaving Facebook, it’s more like teens are growing up and moving into different age groups and the new generation is just not joining Facebook.

    The amount of new users that fit in the age group is greatly outnumbered by the amount of users aging into a new age group.

    • corbett3000 says:

      You can also read this data as “there are 3 million less users in the 13-17 age group now than there were 3 years ago on Facebook”. Doesn’t matter if they aged out or not.

  8. aHeadwork says:

    How was this data acquired? Really curious.

  9. spitfire says:

    So where are they going instead? Is there a new social network that’s replacing facebook?

    • Hallie Easley says:

      To your mom’s house.

    • Julie says:

      Twitter. It’s faster, free of parents, and has a better app than Facebook. As a teenager myself, I have nearly 600 friends and only around 100 really ever use Facebook and most of those users are adults.

  10. […] iStrategyLabs has published a new and insightful report on Facebook’s overall demographics between January 2011 and January 2014, and the findings are pretty clear. […]

  11. The Monkey says:

    I have a teen son and he and his friends all still use Facebook. I don’t think there is any sort of mass exodus, really, just demographic shift, as Jim said. Granted, there are many options so teens are not quite as wrapped up in Facebook as your typical 50-year-old user who doesn’t get out in the “cyber-world” much. Teens use Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, and millions of other more obscure social sites.

    And besides, does anyone really close their Facebook account? It’s much easier to just not use it :)

    • Oliver says:

      that last statement, was exactly what I was thinking. Instead of activelly deleting a FB account, much more would actually just leave it unattended. And thats potentially valid for all target groups – there is a certain hype when you start using FB – after a while you get sick of the missing added value. But you dont delete the account. you just dont go ther anymore. Hence: it would be much more interesting to analyse how the usage rate is changing…

  12. Zotz says:

    Facebook requires too much of an attention span and too much discipline for today’s under-18 crowd. If it can’t be expressed in less than 140 characters, in an evaporating photo, or a short and jittery video, they aren’t interested.

  13. Louis says:

    Good, the original facebook wasn’t supposed to be for teens anyways.

  14. Jonathan says:

    As a high school student myself, I beg to differ. Facebook still serves a fundamental role in a teen’s life, since it fulfills a very different niche than Twitter does. Facebook is used extensively for communication: group projects, clubs, and chatting with specific friends. On the other hand, teens today see alternative social networking websites as “cooler” than Facebook.

    Of course, these conclusions are drawn from my personal experiences, and aren’t necessarily representative of teenagers worldwide. Nevertheless, I’m sure many others would concur.

    • Tommy says:

      Jonathan,

      Great reply! I’m enjoying the discourse here as many people are pointing toward aging demographics as the culprit behind the decline (which I agree likely has a lot to do with it). In addition, I think there are certain social stigmas people have regarding FB now that were not present during its huge run up to its current user base which prevents large numbers of new users from joining.

      My question to you then, is what are the other social sites you feel your peers view as “cooler?” My guesses are Twitter (obviously), Vine videos, Snapchat, Instagram (acquired by FB) and tumblr… but am I missing anything? I’m curious as to what people are using to spread longer form content aside from reddit or FB.

      Also, I appreciate your pointing out a potential observational bias in your discussion. Very astute!

  15. John says:

    Does the author of this post seriously not realize that the teens that “left” Facebook are really just users that got older? The point should be that Facebook isn’t attracting the same number of younger users, meaning it probably hit peak popularity with the main generation that has embraced it.

    • jeremy says:

      Look again. The teen and 18-25 demo both dropped significantly. So unless those teens suddenly turned into 30yr olds there has been a large drop in younger demographic.

  16. Mike says:

    It’s because those teenagers were small children when FB exploded…..they don’t view it as their social media. Plus now that the advertising is at the level it’s at, FB doesn’t target teenagers, they target adults who will click the advertisement and buy the products.
    Teenagers are son social media that is more simplistic (Instagram, Vine, Snap Chat, Twitter)

  17. Jamie says:

    Since those are the smallest age groups represented, all the stat means is that not as many new teens are signing up for FB as have aged into the next age group. Not necessarily that those with accounts are deleting them. Still relevant to businesses targeting the teen demographic, but not signaling of as speedy a downfall of FB as the media implies.

  18. Manny says:

    Sorry, I know very few people on twitter, I’m seeing a very large migration to Instagram…

  19. Steve says:

    Could it have something to do with the surge/presence of the older demographic as the reason teens no longer want to be on Facebook? In other words teens don’t want to be associated with in a virtual social setting with their parents much like in an actual social setting?

  20. Chris says:

    These stats need to be normalized against the population growth ex-Facebook and including facebook. That could give a different story. Even without the baseline, it’s clear the site is catching on with “oldies.”

  21. Luke says:

    Good on the 448,180 who have discovered their gender in the last three years. Go them.

  22. […] is down 25 percent among 13-17 year-olds, via iStrategyLabs and Fast Company. This is a problem for 10 years down the road, when a 17 year-old enters the […]

  23. Joe says:

    So where are they going? Is there another social network they are going to? Or are they all using snapchat and kik and totally avoiding social networking all together? Why?

    Raw data is useful, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. I’d really like to see more data and research into this.

  24. […] experimental uses of social media, and civic innovation programs of all kinds.   Original post on istrategylabs.com →   Comments on reddit.com […]

  25. Red says:

    Facebook is on the way out. It has distorted it’s original purpose of personal communication to a sort of public messageboard full of ads and no longer serves as an efficient method of talking. The only reason I haven’t left it myself is to stay in touch with foreign friends with whom my only alternative is the outdated medium of email.

  26. J- says:

    Data is only as good as its source. I understand that this data was taken from Facebook’s advertising, but those numbers do not accurately represent the claim the author is making. First off, the users didn’t leave, they get older. #commonsense

    Second, calling this a “report” is misleading, perhaps it could be a blog post, but c’mon, a report needs to be valid, have purpose, and some sense of credibility, this lacks in all three. We all know teens did not leave Facebook, they got older, and for some reason new teen users are not joining and perhaps choosing Twitter over Facebook. Now that’s a valid insight.

    Comparing the data overtime that is presented in the “report” is misleading, you cannot make generalized statements applicable overtime, when the data represented is not the same.

    As a fellow researcher in this area, it’s “generalized” reports like this that mislead audiences who do not know to always question the sample and where the data is coming from.

    • corbett3000 says:

      Perhaps more accurately stated “Facebook’s advertising platform shows 3 million fewer addressable teens today than 3 years ago.” Whether people aged out or not is irrelevant.

    • Who says:

      As a practitioner in the field, and a data geek, misleading and inaccurate headlines like this make my job very difficult.

  27. Phil S says:

    We just came out of a population bubble that saw North American universities faced with their highest level applications ever. I was on the front of this bubble when I applied in 2008. It has just ended. My school added hundreds of “beds” to its residences and still could not meet the demand of enrolling students. This year they actually shut down half of one of the buildings. Like everyone has said, the kids grew up. If the 55+ are really affecting the stats of youth its just because there’s a lot of them, and they did better in life than people 5-10 years younger and had more kids all at the same time. Simply put, across NA more adolescents are becoming adults than kids becoming adolescents.

  28. […] Well that is one reason why investors are so excited about Snapchat – just follow the teens and they will take you to the next big thing. This strategy mostly works. We spotted this stat today, that in the last three years, some 3 million teens have left Facebook (Source) […]

  29. Vox says:

    This is not complicated at all, and has been happening to fads for hundreds of years. Kids stop thinking something is cool if their parents start to do it.

  30. areels says:

    Hi. I am one of those Ancients of internets.

    It’s because Facebook has ruined anonymity by forcing to express real identity of people. Dismissing nickname and forcing real name was a mistake.

    Facebook & Google+ are just having benefit of stall in anonymous social platforms.

    mIRC was the best platform of internets. But Khaled Mardam-Bey was stubborn. He never let mIRC to advance. I think, still in 2014, it’s using @ as operator sign.

    One day, someone will realize that the best social platform must have the ;

    Charming design of Facebook&Google+

    Simplicity of whatsapp.

    Anonymity of Reddit&4chan

    Privacy Policy of Twitter

    Enforcing real identity on a social platform is great mistake.

    • Jenn says:

      Well said indeed. Many college students I work with do have FB accounts, but with only their real first name, and those are shrinking as FB makes it harder. Parents and schools have been trying so hard to drill into teens’ heads that adults in positions of power DO check their FB presence and judge them for it (from college admissions to illegal behavior and parental checks), so SnapChat offers the same network of friends without the massive privacy concerns.

  31. what is this table covering? DAU, MAU, sign-ups?

  32. Tino says:

    The demographic that is leaving facebook are the ones who grew up with it and are bored, as well as sick and tired of facebook. I personally know alot of people who are deactivating their account or changing their name simply because they are tired of it.

  33. jimk says:

    The Rock and Roll stat along with the youth drop off reminds me of myspace.

  34. nonya says:

    Facebook is ok publishing the numbers on how many people are on there. Gee, why don’t they publish the number on the amount of time people spend on facebook now vs. a year ago or two years ago? I suspect those numbers are much worse and the amount of time is much lower.

  35. Ang says:

    I wonder how many teens are using Facebook but simply entering an inflated age (or later birth year).

  36. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  37. Joe says:

    Teens are leaving, but adults who buy things like Mercedes, Lexus, Porsche, Rolex, etc., are increasing. I own stock in FB and this is great news. This means FB can go after bigger ad companies for product awareness in which computes to greater revenues. My wife, I, and our friends have been influenced by product ads we see on FB.

    • Penina says:

      Joe,
      You bring up one of the points I am trying to clarify here: what is the overall loss or growth of FB users? I am also curious about *registrants* vs. *active users*. But all these alarm bells about teens leaving Facebook are making it hard to find out whether there is actual loss, or just loss of teens. It looks like I’ll have to break down and do the math myself. :-)

  38. […] iStrategy Labs has some grim statistics to report on Facebook: it’s losing its cool … fast. […]

  39. […] magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many […]

  40. […] left Facebook in the last three years, says a report by digital agency iStrategy Labs. Here is the link to the […]

  41. J says:

    The US population is 317 million (317,374,638). Since 2011 Facebook has grown from 146 million US users (146,805,000) or 46.25% of the US population to 179 million US users (179,800,000) or 56.56% of the US population. That’s an amazing increase driven by adults (mostly college alumni) in the 25-54 age range.

    What this says is that facebook becomes more important for keeping connected once people hit the age of 25 or more. At this age they are more likely further apart geographically from friends and relatives. And once hitting this age they are also more likely to have developed enough contacts and connections who will be on facebook who warrant keeping connected with.

    While the number of US users in the lowest two age ranges of 13-24 decreased by 6.7 million combined overall since 2011, the number of US users in the next single age range of 25-34 increased by 10.8 million for a gain of 4.1 million US users overall between the ages of 13-34. There was also an increase of 16.4 million in the 35-54 age group.

    Increases in international users must also be equally as impressive overall, perhaps more so.

    Overall facebook’s growth in adult users and college alumni users dwarf the reduction in teen and college crowd, many of whom use facebook’s Instagram.

  42. […] Snacpchat, or at least running a similar service that attracts teens and younger users. Source: iStrategyLabs*/ Feature image credit: Shutterstock Read More: […]

  43. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  44. […] câteva luni se tot discută despre declinul Facebook în State, mai ales în rândul tinerilor. Au apărut și la noi câteva articole, mă aștept ca […]

  45. […] Facebook users getting older on average? Very much so, according to a recent study from digital agency iStrategyLabs, which found that the number of teens (aged 13 through 17) was […]

  46. […] tokom protekle tri godine napustilo 3 miliona američkih tinejdžera, objavljuje iStrategyLabs na temelju podataka o potencijalnom dosegu na Facebookovoj platformi za društveno oglašavanje, a […]

  47. […] Facebook users getting older on average? Very much so, according to a recent study from digital agency iStrategyLabs, which found that the number of teens (aged 13 through 17) was […]

  48. […] of  laggards and innovators, a new report came out this week claiming that teens have been fleeing Facebook in droves for the past three […]

  49. […] 3 Million Teens Leave Facebook In 3 Years: The 2014 Facebook Demographic Report. … look at the numbers behind many recent claims: teenagers are leaving by the millions. Enjoy! […]

  50. PsychedBe says:

    Faceb… whaaat?
    What is this madness this article is speaking of?
    I’m going to tweet the sh… out of this one AND I will start to short the FB-shares, gonna tank one day, that’s for sure ;)

  51. […] 3 million teens left Facebook in the past three years, according to iStrategyLabs (published after recording); via @petershankman […]

  52. […] She’s not the only one leaving Facebook either. Over 3 million teens have left in the last three years! […]

  53. Steven Pyck says:

    I am bit puzzled by the numbers.
    The last US census counted 30 million people between 18 and 24. Your article suggest 42 mio US Facebook members. For those who yell “it is under 13 yr olds making a profile with an older age, let’s then look at 2 other data points.
    - US census says 41,2 mio in the group 25-34. The article suggests 44 mio members
    - US census says 92,6 mio in the larger group 13-34. The article suggests 95,8 mio members in the same group.
    I understand you got your data from FB. Are these to be trusted ?

  54. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  55. […] biri olarak bu konuyu göstermişti. Danışmanlık firması iStrategy Labs hazırladığı bir raporda Facebook’un son 3 yıl içerisinde sadece ABD’den 11 milyon genç kullanıcı kaybettiğini […]

  56. […] say Facebook is not cool anymore. Another study by iStrategyLabs shows that the amount of teens on Facebook has declined by 25 percent since 2011. […]

  57. […] Facebook users getting older on average? Very much so, according to a recent study from digital agency iStrategyLabs, which found that the number of teens (aged 13 through 17) […]

  58. […] crescita superiore all’80%. I dati sono riportati da una ricerca della società di consulenza iStrategyLabs. L’incremento così significativo nella popolazione anziana ha di recuperare in modo […]

  59. […] that teens are leaving Facebook by the millions have been proved by a recent report from istrategylabs. The report only covers the U.S but it proves the long running rumour that teens are abandoning the […]

  60. […] are three million fewer teens using Facebook in the U.S. than there were in 2011, according to iStrategy Labs, a digital agency that has tracked […]

  61. […] infographie basée sur les chiffres de la société istrategylabs. Ces derniers nous donnent notamment une idée de la croissance de l’utilisation de facebook […]

  62. […] are three million fewer teens using Facebook in the U.S. than there were in 2011, according to iStrategy Labs, a digital agency that has tracked […]

  63. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  64. […] Yesterday, iStrategyLabs came out with a report that appears to prove Facebook’s teenager exodus. According to iStrategy, which pulls its data from Facebook’s social ad tool, the number of users aged 13-24 in the United States has declined by more than 6 million since January 2011. If the data is correct, Facebook’s teenage user base in the U.S. shrank by an alarming 25 percent in the past three years, indicating that Facebook does indeed have trouble reaching young users. […]

  65. […] REQUEST DENIED: TEENS FLEE FACEBOOKAccording to a new study, teenagers ages 13 to 17 are bolting from Facebook in droves. A research firm found a nearly 25 […]

  66. […] are three million fewer teens using Facebook in the U.S. than there were in 2011, according to iStrategy Labs, a digital agency that has tracked […]

  67. […] are three million fewer teens using Facebook in the U.S. than there were in 2011, according to iStrategy Labs, a digital agency that has tracked […]

  68. […] eigenen Angaben hat ISL für die Auswertung im Jahr 2011 und und die jetzige wieder die Daten genutzt, die Facebook […]

  69. Misti says:

    The younger market has not left social media; they prefer other platforms. Don’t panic. Adapt.

  70. […] may be losing teens (/the cool kids), but contrary to some beliefs, 2014 will not be a dire year for the […]

  71. […] the magnitude of this lost interest has been. On Wednesday, the digital consultancy iStrategy Labs released a study that draws from Facebook’s Social Advertising platform to glean exactly how many young users […]

  72. chris brock says:

    Facebook has purged many fake profiles and duplicate accounts from the USA audience from 2011 to 2014, which would reflect the massive drops in the data. Teens will continue to use Facebook as it is the social authentication layer of the web. See this old VentureBeat article: http://venturebeat.com/…/26/facebook-fake-fans-followers/

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  77. […] U.S. Users: 180 million users in the U.S. […]

  78. […] altert. Die Kohorte 55+ bei Facebook wächst und wächst, während sich Teens zunehmend in Richtung […]

  79. […] Woche kann ich feststellen, dass meine Analyse wohl zutreffender war als die der professionellen Marktforscher. Dass sich der Anzeigenpreis nahezu verdoppelt (siehe heise.de zur Quartalsmeldung) hat, passt zu […]

  80. […] Tatsache. Sie ist aber mit einiger Vorsicht zu betrachten, denn was Agenturen wie iStrategyLabs da untersuchen, gilt zunächst einmal nur für US-Jugendliche. Zwar dürfte die Entwicklung in Deutschland einen […]

  81. […] arena.  Especially since they’re loosing a lot of their younger audience.  According to an istrategy labs study, 3 million teens have left facebook since 2011, while the 55+ community has grown 80%!  That is […]

  82. […] estudio reciente de iStrategyLabs durante tres años indica que el número de usuarios de Facebook en EEUU, en el […]

  83. […] er das ja mal. Das Jahr hatte noch gar nicht ganz begonnen, da machte eine Untersuchung der Agentur iStrategyLabs die Runde, der zufolge Facebook einen immensen Schwund an Teenagern zu beklagen hat. So hätten in […]

  84. […] que parece que, de momento, a Facebook le van genial las cosas. Ni siquiera el estudio de iStrategyLabs que afirma que en los últimos 3 años la red social ha perdido 3 millones de usuarios adolescentes […]

  85. […] are leaving Facebook. That does appear to be based on real data. In fact, in the last 3 years, Facebook lost over 3 million teens and over 3 million 18-24 year olds. In a universe of infinite choice of websites, TV channels, and apps, who would expect teens to […]

  86. […] études menées aux Etats-Unis, Facebook devrait perdre 80% de ses utilisateurs d’ici 2017, et les « jeunes » entre 13 et 25 ans préfèreraient désormais Twitter ou le nouveau venu Snapchat. Tandis que les 25-34 ans et les 35-54 ans, qui ont vu naître Facebook, s’accrocheraient, eux, […]

  87. […] noch Marktplatz sein wird – darüber herrscht Uneinigkeit. Das Marktforschungsunternehmen iStrategyLabs hat erhoben, dass sich bereits in den vergangenen drei Jahren rund drei Millionen Teenager von Facebook […]

  88. […] nos últimos três anos, segundo estudo realizado pela iStrategy Labs, mais de três milhões de jovens deletaram suas contas do […]

  89. […] la part des 35-54 ans qui utilisent Facebook aux Etats-Unis, selon une étude d’iStrategyLabs publiée le 15 janvier dernier. Cette tranche est la plus présente sur le réseau, devant les […]

  90. […] out figures to show that overall engagement on the network is increasing, perhaps to drown out the chorus of reports that daily usage among millennials is […]

  91. […] Un estudio reciente de iStrategyLabs durante tres años indica que el número de usuarios de Facebook en EEUU, en el grupo de edad de 13 a 17 años, se redujo en tres millones (un 25 % menos del total de usuarios de esa franja de edad), mientras que los mayores de 55 años crecieron en 12,5 millones de miembros (un 80 %). […]

  92. […] 35-54 ans utilisent Facebook aux Etats-Unis, selon une étude d’iStrategyLabs publiée le 15 janvier dernier. Cette tranche est la plus présente sur le réseau, devant les […]

  93. […] past fall, Facebook announced a “decrease in daily users, specifically amongst teens”. An iStrategyLabs report found teenage users (ages 13 to 17) have declined 25% within the last three years; dropping to 9.8 […]

  94. […] has been a lot of buzz lately about Facebook losing their younger demo. And while it is true that Facebook has lost 3 million teenagers since 2011 (a 25 percent drop), 73 percent of Americans teenagers ages 12 to 17 are still keeping active […]

  95. […] Facebook users getting older on average? Very much so, according to a recent study from digital agency iStrategyLabs, which found that the number of teens (aged 13 through 17) […]

  96. […] Pitch: Over the last three years the number of teenagers using Facebook has declined by 25 percent, while the number of users 55 and older has gone up more than 80 percent. The founders say college […]

  97. […] Pitch: Over the last three years the number of teenagers using Facebook has declined by 25 percent, while the number of users 55 and older has gone up more than 80 percent. The founders say college […]

  98. […] Written by: Laurie Cutts, Director of Marketing @Nanigans Numerous reports suggest that Facebook is losing audience among teens but this doesn’t necessarily spell doom for […]

  99. […] the past three years, Facebook has lost three million users from it’s core demographic of young users. That equates to a decrease of young users by 25%. […]

  100. […] Pitch: Over the last three years the number of teenagers using Facebook has declined by 25 percent, while the number of users 55 and older has gone up more than 80 percent. The founders say college […]

  101. […] [1] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/21/teens-facebook-pew-study_n_3313812.html [2] http://istrategylabs.com/2014/01/3-million-teens-leave-facebook-in-3-years-the-2014-facebook-demogra…3] http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/cyber-bullying-facebook-twitter-askfm-2328238 […]

  102. […] in the run-up to the big day. Market researcher iStrategy Labs calculated that there had been a mass exodus in teenage users — their bread and butter — having lost 3 million in just three years’ time. Then […]

  103. […] Ik ga niet met cijfers strooien. Google maar eens naar “social media gebruik 2013”, je vindt genoeg.   3 mln tieners verlaten Facebook in 3 jaar […]

  104. […] study by digital agency iStrategyLabs, found that the number of teens using Facebook was down 25.3 […]

  105. […] study by digital agency iStrategyLabs, found that the number of teens using Facebook was down 25.3 […]

  106. […] ajans iStrategyLabs’ın yayınladığı rapor 2011’den bu yana kaç gencin sosyal ağı terk ettiğini ortaya […]

  107. […] study by digital agency iStrategyLabs found that the number of teens using Facebook was down 25.3 percent […]

  108. […] Despite competition from newer social networks, the number of Facebook users is projected to exceed the population of China in 2014. Although Facebook keeps growing, the website’s original intended audience might have started disappear. Between 2011 and 2014, more than 3 million Facebook users ages 13 to 24 abandoned their profiles. […]

  109. […] A recent study on Facebook demographics indicates that women comprise 53.3 percent of U.S. users, with those over 18 living in big anti-gun cities, (New York City, Chicago, and Los Angeles were the top three respectively) accounting for the largest percentages. I was sure I would find powerful anti-gun sentiment on Facebook, but I was wrong. […]

  110. […] main purpose here is to attract young users again, as the number of teenage Facebook users has declined by 25% over the last 3 years, as more and more parents and people over 55, join the network with an […]

  111. […] declining in popularity? First, are rumors true—are people abandoning Facebook in droves? A study by digital agency iStrategy found that Facebook users declined by 25.3% in the 13-to-17-year-old […]

  112. […] age group and a whopping 80.4% increase for the 55+ group. The chart put together by DJ Saul at iStrategyLabs included some other interesting statistics, including the growth rate for certain cities. While […]

  113. […] In addition, the survey looked at Facebook usage rates for specific cities in the US. You can get the complete details by checking the iStrategyLabs Facebook demographic report. […]

  114. […] study by digital agency iStrategy found that Facebook users declined by 25.3% in the 13-to-17-year-old age […]

  115. […] Data like these also misleads us. It makes us go crazy and become worried! But as so many of you have pointed out, we forget that those “young teens” are no longer young, and they have grown into older age group segments. The main problem with the figure remains multi-fold: […]

  116. […] more evidence? A January 2014 report by iStrategyLabs found that between 2011 and 2013, the coveted market of teenaged U.S. Facebook […]

  117. […] worldwide and over 180 million users in the United States alone— almost 60% of the population, according to iStrategyLabs. Facebook has become a mainstay cultural and social way to communicate in our […]

  118. […] worldwide and over 180 million users in the United States alone— almost 60% of the population, according to iStrategyLabs. Facebook has become a mainstay cultural and social way to communicate in our […]

  119. […] users worldwide and over 180 million users within the U.s. alone— almost 60% of the population, in accordance with iStrategyLabs. Facebook has become a mainstay cultural and social strategy to communicate in our […]

  120. […] and over 180 million users in the United States alone— almost 60% of the population, according to iStrategyLabs. Facebook has become a mainstay cultural and social way to communicate in our […]

  121. […] worldwide and over 180 million users in the United States alone— almost 60% of the population, according to iStrategyLabs. Facebook has become a mainstay cultural and social way to communicate in our […]

  122. […] (More information on this graph can be found here.) […]

  123. […] communicating with each other on social media? Over the past 3 years, the number of teenagers using Facebook has declined by 25%, opening the door for smaller social networks to grab a piece of the market share. Could some of […]

  124. […] from 2011 to 2014, approximately 3,000,000 Teens left Facebook representing a 25.3% decline in Teen […]

  125. […] Now, the largest group on Facebook is the 35-54 year olds, followed by 25 – 34 year olds (source: iStrategy Labs). Facebook’s audience is aging because teens, new to social media, are making other […]

  126. […] to a younger generation. But Hack won’t work for many projects and Facebook isn’t so hip to youth […]

  127. […] youth are leaving the social network Facebook. Especially British and American kids. You can read here that 3 million teens aged 13-17 left Facebook between 2011 and 2014. I understand having parents on […]

  128. […] year olds are leaving Facebook, and this trend may […]

  129. […] no es la única red social en mostrar estos síntomas… si bien ha perdido 4% de usuarios -unos seis millones- en países donde tocó techo, siguen siendo datos muy optimistas frente al 58% […]

  130. […] mieux est sans doute de partie de l’étude démographique publiée par iStrategyLabs en janvier dernier. Ses chiffres et ses conclusions sont évidemment à prendre avec des pincettes, […]

  131. […] de Facebook, fortement critiqué récemment sur sa perte de popularité auprès de cette audience. Un rapport est récemment sorti faisant état que Facebook avait perdu 3 millions de jeunes utilisateurs sur les es trois […]

  132. […] recent report from iStrategyLabs states 25% fewer U.S. teens use Facebook now than in 2011. It’s because all trends come full […]

  133. […] die Bedenken der Benutzer und auch der Gigant Facebook spürt Veränderungen in der Nutzerbasis (sie werden älter) und dem Nutzerverhalten (sie teilen bewusster, klicken seltener auf Werbung). Unternehmen machen […]

  134. […] Facebook’s changing demographic (teens are leaving!) […]

  135. […] report from digital agency iStrategyLabs breaks down just how many teens have abandoned the monster social network since 2011. According to […]

  136. […] Over the same period of time, 55+ has exploded with +80.4% growth in the last 3 years. (source=iStrategyLabs) […]

  137. […] Facebook enfrenta atualmente um sério problema de falta de coolness entre cerca de 1/3 dos adolescentes americanos. Vários dados têm assinalado isso mesmo, […]

  138. […] Die ohnehin schon weit verbreitete Plattform „Facebook“ wächst weiterhin, wenn auch ein Nutzerrückgang bei den Jugendlichen zu verzeichnen ist. Jeder dritte Deutsche hat einen Facebook-Account. […]

  139. […] und Informationsvermittlung zeigt sich in den letzten zwei bis drei Jahren besonders deutlich. So verliert Facebook stetig User, vor allem unter den jungen Nutzern. Gleichzeitig steigt das Interesse an reinen Mobilanwendungen […]

  140. […] A report from digital agency iStrategyLabs breaks down just how many teens have abandoned this behemoth of a social network since 2011. Some key facts as per the study, […]

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